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Rural Self Government in Bengal Naresh Chandra Roy

Rural Self Government in Bengal

Naresh Chandra Roy

Published March 1st 2007
ISBN : 9781406768046
Paperback
216 pages
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 About the Book 

RURAL SELF-GOVERNMENT IN BENGAL RURAL SELF-GOVERNMENT IN BENGAL BY NARESH CHANDRA ROY, M. A., Ph. D. PROFESSOR OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE, CITY COLLEGE, CALCUTTA AUTHOR OF A MONOGRAPH ON THE SEPARATION OF EXECUTIVE AND JUDICIAL POWERS INMoreRURAL SELF-GOVERNMENT IN BENGAL RURAL SELF-GOVERNMENT IN BENGAL BY NARESH CHANDRA ROY, M. A., Ph. D. PROFESSOR OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE, CITY COLLEGE, CALCUTTA AUTHOR OF A MONOGRAPH ON THE SEPARATION OF EXECUTIVE AND JUDICIAL POWERS IN BRITISH INDIA I INDIAN CIVIL SERVICE, ETC. PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF CALCUTTA 1936 PREFACE Local Self-Government has hitherto been a neglected domain of Indian administration. The little enthusiasm that has been created of late in this field is due mainly to the leadership of a number of gentlemen who have organised the Institute of Local Self-Government in Bombay. Their pioneering activities are now fortunately finding imitators in other provinces of the country. A member of the Servants of India Society has set up a similar Institute at Lahore and he also took the initiative of organising the first All-India Local Self-Government Conference which was held last spring at Delhi. It is expected that Conferences of this character will direct, with increasing insistence, the attention of both social workers and scholars to the proper and scientific tudy of the administration of the local bodies in our country and of the different problems which they are called upon to tackle. In the following pages an account has been given as to the growth of the rural local bodies of Bengal, c. j., the Union Boards, Local Boards and District Boards and as to their constitution, functions and finances. For the two historical chapters, the writer had of course to depend upon the relevant Parliamentary Papers and the proceedings of the Legislative Councils. For the rest of the book however he had to collect his information and materials mainly by personalinvestiga tion. The Annual in some cases Biennial Resolutions of the Provincial Governments on the working of these local bodies have no doubt been consulted and many facts and figures borrowed from them. Similarly the Reports of the District Boards have in many cases been of considerable assistance to the writer. It should however be noted that many of the District Boards do not care to print and publish their Annual VI PREFACE Reports. In manuscript they submit these documents to the Divisional Commissioners and keep a copy or two of them in their own archives so that when necessary a member may call for and consult them. This does not appear to be a practice in the right lines. All the District Boards should make it a point to publish these reports. Tf the District Board of Howrah is not financially handicapped in this matter, it is unlikely that the other Boards may put forward this ground for being remiss in this respect. The publication of the reports has many advantages. It not only helps the social workers and students of public administration in easily getting at the necessary facts and figures but as they arc discussed in the press, it rivets public attention upon the working of the Boards. That is no small return for the expense of publication. As it has been hinted in the previous paragraph, the writer depended mostly for his information neither on Govern ment Resolutions nor on the Reports of the Boards them selves. The help derived from them has been great but not primary in character. The writer came into touch with many persons connected with the local administration of the province. He framed a questionnaire and answers were invited from these gentlemen. He cannot thankthem too much for the alacrity and courtesy with which they respond ed to his appeal. From some of them he not only received written answers to his queries but he had the opportunity of discussing with them many aspects of the local administra tion in details. It is by such discussions that many of the dark corners in the administration of the local bodies became clear. The informants of the writer were persons differently connected with local administration. Some were members of the Union Boards and acted for several terms as Presidents of these bodies...